Photo 5 Oct 133 notes mel-men:

- Cheese Stealer -

mel-men:

- Cheese Stealer -

via MelMen.
Photo 5 Oct 285 notes findmomo:

I want to hold your hand.

findmomo:

I want to hold your hand.

via find momo.
Photo 30 Sep 167 notes mycreativevoid:

GoodNight - MyCreativeVoid  © Taylor St. Photography 2014
“DO NOT listen to your brain. Ain’t nothin’ worth much there.”
- qbnscholar
(queue)

mycreativevoid:

GoodNight MyCreativeVoid  © Taylor St. Photography 2014

DO NOT listen to your brain. Ain’t nothin’ worth much there.”

- qbnscholar

(queue)

Photo 27 Sep 306 notes fuckyeahmexico:

Las momias de Guanajuato, 1950’s

fuckyeahmexico:

Las momias de Guanajuato, 1950’s

(Source: poollaaa)

Photo 26 Sep 1,264 notes bhgfood:

When life hands you lemons, make lemon curd. Perfect for dressing up scones, tarts, pastries + more! (BHG.com)

bhgfood:

When life hands you lemons, make lemon curd. Perfect for dressing up scones, tarts, pastries + more! (BHG.com)

via .
Photo 26 Sep 246 notes bellebunnies:

LEAFY GREENS These foods should make up about 75% of the fresh portion of your rabbit’s diet (about 1 packed cup per 2 lbs of body weight per day).
Leafy Greens I (need to be rotated due to oxalic acid content and only 1 out of three varieties of greens a day should be from this list)
Parsley
Spinach
Mustard greens
Beet greens
Swiss chard
Radish tops
Sprouts (from 1 to 6 days after sprouting, sprouts have higher levels of alkaloids)
Leafy Greens II (low in oxalic acid)
Arugula
Carrot tops
Cucumber leaves
Endive
Ecarole
Frisee Lettuce
Kale (all types)
Mache
Red or green lettuce
Romaine lettuce
Spring greens
Turnip greens
Dandelion greens
Mint (any variety)
Basil (any variety)
Watercress
Wheatgrass
Chicory
Raspberry leaves
Cilantro
Radicchio
Bok Choy
Fennel (the leafy tops as well as the base)
Borage leaves
Dill leaves
Yu choy
NON-LEAFY VEGETABLES
These should be no more than about 15 % of the diet (About 1 tablespoon per 2 lbs of body weight per day).
Carrots
Broccoli (leaves and stems)
Edible flowers (roses, nasturtiums, pansies, hibiscus)
Celery
Bell peppers (any color)
Chinese pea pods (the flat kind without large peas)
Brussel sprouts
Cabbage (any type)
Broccolini
Summer squash
Zucchini squash

bellebunnies:

LEAFY GREENS
These foods should make up about 75% of the fresh portion of your rabbit’s diet (about 1 packed cup per 2 lbs of body weight per day).

Leafy Greens I (need to be rotated due to oxalic acid content and only 1 out of three varieties of greens a day should be from this list)

  • Parsley
  • Spinach
  • Mustard greens
  • Beet greens
  • Swiss chard
  • Radish tops
  • Sprouts (from 1 to 6 days after sprouting, sprouts have higher levels of alkaloids)

Leafy Greens II (low in oxalic acid)

  • Arugula
  • Carrot tops
  • Cucumber leaves
  • Endive
  • Ecarole
  • Frisee Lettuce
  • Kale (all types)
  • Mache
  • Red or green lettuce
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Spring greens
  • Turnip greens
  • Dandelion greens
  • Mint (any variety)
  • Basil (any variety)
  • Watercress
  • Wheatgrass
  • Chicory
  • Raspberry leaves
  • Cilantro
  • Radicchio
  • Bok Choy
  • Fennel (the leafy tops as well as the base)
  • Borage leaves
  • Dill leaves
  • Yu choy

NON-LEAFY VEGETABLES

These should be no more than about 15 % of the diet (About 1 tablespoon per 2 lbs of body weight per day).

  • Carrots
  • Broccoli (leaves and stems)
  • Edible flowers (roses, nasturtiums, pansies, hibiscus)
  • Celery
  • Bell peppers (any color)
  • Chinese pea pods (the flat kind without large peas)
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Cabbage (any type)
  • Broccolini
  • Summer squash
  • Zucchini squash
Photo 26 Sep 2,078 notes

(Source: marahoffman)

Photo 26 Sep 37 notes bellebunnies:

What Kind of Supportive Care do Rabbits with Missing Limbs Need? Tri-pawed and other missing-limbs rabbits will have some special care needs beyond those of a rabbit with all four legs.

Slippery flooring is a big problem for a missing-limb rabbit. They will need an enclosure with flooring that provides plenty of traction to help prevent them slipping and sliding. Cotton towels, rugs or fleece are great options.
A rabbit who is missing a back limb will need help with ear cleaning. See our page on Ear Care for more information.
They may have trouble balancing when grooming, eating or performing other tasks. Consider lining their pen with some rolled towels tied with jute twine or sisal rope (to prevent unraveling) or adding a stuffed animal for them to lean against when they need help.
Keep a careful eye on the remaining feet and, if applicable, the stump of the removed leg. A rabbit with a missing limb/s will be especially prone to sore hocks because the remaining limbs have to do the job of what is normally four legs. See our Sore Hocks page for more information on preventing and treating sore hocks.
It is important to keep a missing-limb rabbit at a healthy weight. Excess weight is not good for any rabbit but can be especially harmful for a missing-limb rabbit as they have fewer limbs to support that weight. 
Rabbits with a missing hind limb may have trouble using a traditional litter box. Consider a more convenient, low entry litter box like the ones we mention on our Litter Boxes page.
A rabbit missing both hind limbs will require a very special setup and help keeping clean. Visit our Bedding and Baths & Cleaning pages for more information on those topics.

PrognosisRabbits adapt remarkably well to life with three legs (and can even adapt to life with two, if cared for properly). We know lots of little bunnies who get around just fine with a missing leg- they run, hop, play, binky, get into trouble, just the same as any normal bun. Rabbits who lose a hind limb to amputation do take a bit longer to regain their footing than buns who lose a front limb (just because of a rabbit’s natural reliance on their back legs), but they do learn to adjust to their new way of hopping. Though there are still some owners and professionals who advocate euthanasia for a simple broken leg, there are tri-pawed rabbits all over the world who are still living quality lives and we urge people, should they face amputation, to give their bunny a chance- they will surprise you with their ability to overcome life with three legs.
Scooter  is pictured above and was born without hind legs, but he has adapted well and is a happy little bun. Follow Scooter here: https://www.facebook.com/ScooterinTexas

bellebunnies:

What Kind of Supportive Care do Rabbits with Missing Limbs Need? Tri-pawed and other missing-limbs rabbits will have some special care needs beyond those of a rabbit with all four legs.

  • Slippery flooring is a big problem for a missing-limb rabbit. They will need an enclosure with flooring that provides plenty of traction to help prevent them slipping and sliding. Cotton towels, rugs or fleece are great options.
  • A rabbit who is missing a back limb will need help with ear cleaning. See our page on Ear Care for more information.
  • They may have trouble balancing when grooming, eating or performing other tasks. Consider lining their pen with some rolled towels tied with jute twine or sisal rope (to prevent unraveling) or adding a stuffed animal for them to lean against when they need help.
  • Keep a careful eye on the remaining feet and, if applicable, the stump of the removed leg. A rabbit with a missing limb/s will be especially prone to sore hocks because the remaining limbs have to do the job of what is normally four legs. See our Sore Hocks page for more information on preventing and treating sore hocks.
  • It is important to keep a missing-limb rabbit at a healthy weight. Excess weight is not good for any rabbit but can be especially harmful for a missing-limb rabbit as they have fewer limbs to support that weight. 
  • Rabbits with a missing hind limb may have trouble using a traditional litter box. Consider a more convenient, low entry litter box like the ones we mention on our Litter Boxes page.
  • A rabbit missing both hind limbs will require a very special setup and help keeping clean. Visit our Bedding and Baths & Cleaning pages for more information on those topics.

Prognosis
Rabbits adapt remarkably well to life with three legs (and can even adapt to life with two, if cared for properly). We know lots of little bunnies who get around just fine with a missing leg- they run, hop, play, binky, get into trouble, just the same as any normal bun. Rabbits who lose a hind limb to amputation do take a bit longer to regain their footing than buns who lose a front limb (just because of a rabbit’s natural reliance on their back legs), but they do learn to adjust to their new way of hopping. Though there are still some owners and professionals who advocate euthanasia for a simple broken leg, there are tri-pawed rabbits all over the world who are still living quality lives and we urge people, should they face amputation, to give their bunny a chance- they will surprise you with their ability to overcome life with three legs.

Scooter  is pictured above and was born without hind legs, but he has adapted well and is a happy little bun. Follow Scooter here: https://www.facebook.com/ScooterinTexas

Photo 25 Sep 3,757 notes bennybuckle:

Sunrise|

bennybuckle:

Sunrise|

via Benny|b.
Photo 25 Sep 69 notes i-long-to-travel-the-world:

Tuscany, Italy | Adnan Bubalo - If you love this beautiful picture, like it. We post stuff just like this every day on Facebook. Like us by clicking here: http://on.fb.me/1bgLOYJ - You won’t regret it.

i-long-to-travel-the-world:

Tuscany, Italy | Adnan Bubalo - If you love this beautiful picture, like it. We post stuff just like this every day on Facebook. Like us by clicking here: http://on.fb.me/1bgLOYJ - You won’t regret it.


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